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Internationales Literaturfestival Berlin

The Syrian-born author speaks on Sep 17, 18:00 at Collegium Hungaricum Berlin. His talk on the impact of migration on mental health is one of our top picks. Read more

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The South Korean author talks on Sep 14, 21:00, at Collegium Hungaricum Berlin. Her debut novel "The Incendiaries" was a must-read, now she's one of our lit fest must-hears. Read more

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Ahead of his talk on Sep 13, 19:30, at the James-Simon-Galerie, we get the low-down on the author at the forefront of climate-change literature. Read more

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Don't miss the Nigerian writer's talk on Sep 13, 20:00, at HAU. Eloquent and engaging, she's one of our top events. Read more

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Opening Sep 11 through Sep 21, International Literature Festival Berlin is back with a record 220 guests and a packed programme of events taking over stages across the city. We take a look at this year’s lit trends. Read more

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Berlin is scooting towards the e-revolution – or is it? EXB investigates how the "Verkehrswende" is coming along. Also in this issue: e-scooters tested, the local skating scene revisited and September's book, film and art fests previewed! Out now! Read more

The 18th International Literature Festival came to an end on last Saturday. Time to look back and reflect after 10 days. Read more

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As the ILB slowly comes to an end, we look at two questions. How can drugs be legalized? And how can we understand Russia? Read more

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(C)VALERIO PAZZI

Federico Varese is professor of criminology at Oxford, a mafia expert and the author of "Mafia Life". His book chronicles the ins-and-outs of organized crime. Read more

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Nigerian author and video artist Akwaeke Emezi brought her debut autobiography Freshwater (2018) to the International Literature Festival this year. We chatted about her widely celebrated book, which analyzes the experience of having a fractured self Read more

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Burmese-American author Charmaine Craig first came to prominence with her US bestseller The Good Men, published in 2002 and translated into six languages. It would be 15 years before she resurfaced with her second novel Miss Burma. Read more

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Gender, sexuality, food: The first ILB weekend was chock-full of topical readings and discussions... Read more

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Bad girl of lit, bird lover, Brandenburger-by-choice – novelist Nell Zink is many things... including busy. Not just with a book a year, either. On Sep 11 and Sep 12 at Haus der Berliner Festspiele, you can see for yourself what that might mean. Read more

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The International Literature Festival is underway, kicking off Wednesday night with a speech from Eva Menasse. Here are our impressions of its start. Read more

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American literary shooting star Yaa Gyasi filled us in on her opinions about race, violence and the importance of small goals. Returning to the ILB, she will read from her successful debut novel "Homegoing" on September 5, 23:00 at Le Bar. Read more

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Ahead of his reading on the September 6 at the International Literature Festival Berlin (and as a taste of our upcoming coverage – stay tuned), Self talks LSD, the eeriness of Grindr and the psychotic nature of Berlin’s urban spaces. ILB: Sep 5-15. Read more

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As we wrap up this year's ILB, we reflect on our favorite moments and overall takeaways. Read more

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Fresh off her 2016 Stella Prize for her novel, The Natural Way of Things, Australian author Charlotte Wood talked to us about Berlin, feminism, and the immersive power of fiction writing. Read more

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Canadian author Madeleine Thien read from her award-winning book "Do Not Say We Have Nothing" last night at the Berliner Festspiele. We chatted with her beforehand about Berlin, history and how one should not look at China. Read more

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We spoke to the grand dame of Irish letters, Edna O' Brien, who was at the lit fest yesterday presenting her novel "The Little Red Chairs", about influences on her work, the current state of literature and the "criminal act" of writing. Read more

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